Politica

Austin’s Capital Metro Sign Massively Fails At Spanish

What’s diversity good for in a state like Texas? Perhaps not failing on an epic level at a simple translated sign? It’d be great if someone could give Capital Metro in Austin the memo because I spotted this sign earlier today on 4th & Congress and just about blew a gasket at how bad the translation is.

Now, I’m by no means a Spanish scholar, but when I first saw this sign I did a double take. Then I asked some native speakers to confirm my suspicions and we all just busted out laughing at how poorly Capital Metro translated this sign. It’s as though they aren’t even trying.

For example, the word “moved” was translated to “movada” — which is a word that doesn’t actually exist. Then later, in a longer explanation, Capital Metro changes it up and says “movado” instead of “moved” — but that’s not a word, either.

This is in addition to the fact that the translation is so clumsy and literal that it seems likely that it went through a Google translator and directly onto this sign. I know of at least two Hispanic marketing agencies in town that have tried to work with Capital Metro, and from the looks of it, they should be getting called back right about now.

I find it amazing not only that a translation this bad could get through an agency that serves a large Hispanic population, but that they’d proudly slap their logo on it for all of the world to see without double-checking to see if it’s correct. Isn’t that even protocol when you do stuff in English?

Please share this far and wide!

UPDATE from our friend Alexandra: Capital Metro’s CEO Linda Watson was honored July 15 with the 2014 Executive of the Year award during the 43rd National Meeting and Training Conference held by the Conference Of Minority Transportation Officials (COMTO) in Atlanta.

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